Tejano Ranching Family Day

tejanofam feat
© 

Tejano Ranching Family Day

 
SAN ANTONIO – Roots of the modern Tejano identity run far deeper than today’s fashion or popular music. Following Mexico’s independence from Spain in the 1820s, Tejanos established a flourishing agricultural lifestyle on early ranchos and land grants. As many of the first true cowboys, Tejano vaqueros founded a legacy which is still visible today.
 
On Sunday, Sept. 14, noon to 5 p.m., the Institute of Texan Cultures presents Tejano Ranching Family Day, a free Second Sunday event. This program provides visitors the opportunity to explore Tejano culture and life on historic rancho.
 
The descendents of early vaqueros continue to maintain a vibrant Tejano culture through the food, music, and lifeways of the past.
 
"This type of programming offers a perspective of Tejano culture not often seen in modern Texas," said Brandon Anioł, educational specialist and coordinator of the program. "In recent decades, Tejano culture has become increasingly associated with modern music, images, style and popular culture. This program will help people discover where the Tejano identity originated."
 
Visitors will enjoy an opportunity to interact with practicing vaqueros from across the state of Texas. King Ranch educator Lolo Trevino, a kineño – his heritage traces back to early vaqueros of the King Ranch -- will present the lifeways his family has practiced for generations.
 
Members of the Victoriano Flores family, national champions in Charro Completo, all seven disciplines of Mexican rodeo, will talk to guests about Charreada, and the work that goes into being a professional cowboy.
 
Food demonstrations will include horno – clay oven - cooking, with pan de campo, and handmade tortillas. The program will feature a medicinal herb folk healer, commonly known as a curandero. Guests can explore a fully stocked chuck wagon and practice their roping skills. Additionally, Texas Folklife Festival performers Binisa and Itza Zentella, commonly known as Los Inocentes, will play an afternoon concert of corridos and baladas.
 
In addition to partnering with the King Ranch, the Institute of Texan Cultures welcomes activities and demonstrations from Texas Parks & Wildlife, the Texas Historical Commission, Vaquero Productions, and the Briscoe Western Art Museum
 
"Tejano Ranching Family Day is an exciting event for the whole family," said Anioł. "Visitors can celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month while exploring one of the defining cultures of Texas.
 
The Institute of Texan Cultures is located on the UTSA HemisFair Park Campus, 801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd., a short distance from the Alamo and the River Walk. Regular hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $8 for adults (ages 12-64); $7 for seniors (ages 65+); $6 for children (ages 3-11); free with membership, UTSA or Alamo Colleges identification, and on the second Sunday each month. For more information, call 210-458-2300.
 
 
 

Back

 
 
UTSA
©2014 Institute of Texan Cultures. University of Texas at San Antonio. All Rights Reserved.
 

WB2

Receive Texan Cultures E-Blast Updates

Official Institute of Texan Cultures Periodic Bulletin:

Enter your e-mail address to receive periodic information on announcements, news, events and event schedule changes.

 
 

WB2